As is typically the case with remote positions, you will need to have a dedicated workspace in your home, and a PC with a high-speed Internet connection. You may also need to purchase specific equipment, which could include a headset, flash drive, or a dual monitor. You must also be a “people person”, and will be required to be available seven days a week.
Kelly Services is one of the most popular employment agencies in the US. Best known for temporary jobs, the company began operations in 1946, and now offers positions in more than 30 countries around the world. It has more than 500,000 workers around the globe. Ranked Number 8 on the FlexJobs 2019 list, Kelly Services has moved up two notches for 2020.
This is an amazing list of work at home jobs! I am currently working on a home business but it would be nice if I could land a work at home job from your list above to introduce a little more freedom in my life and have some more time for working on my home business. I have already went through the Working Solutions process and hope all goes well but I won’t stop there. Wish me Luck! Thanks again Lashay…
Do not work from the bed. Do not work from the couch. Do not work from the futon. In fact, let’s just say don’t work anywhere that lets you recline if you can help it. If those are the only options available to you, that’s OK! Just try to find a nearby coffee table to use as a desk, or anything that keeps your laptop out of your literal lap for most of the day. It helps with focus, yes, but also those things get hot.

If you were not able to find luck with the list of jobs I have presented above, visit FlexJobs. This job site has been rated by the Better Business Bureau with an A+. They even provide a money-back guarantee in case you are not satisfied with how they deliver their service. FlexJobs assures that every single work posted is hand-screened to check its legitimacy. This is a fantastic method to find legit home-based jobs without the worries of handling scams.


I think the best solution, both for your work life and sanity, is to use Slack more than functionally. Check in with people even if you don't have a work-related reason to. Send them dumb tweets. Don't be afraid of italics and exclamation points. It'll never be the same as grabbing a midday coffee or a beer after work, but it helps to remind people that you're not just out there in the void. And when the conversation does center around work, know when to switch from Slack to phone. You'll be surprised how much can get lost in translation when you only type.
If you’re looking for a more traditional job, start by looking on sites like ZipRecruiter, Indeed.com, Glassdoor, or even LinkedIn’s job board. You can filter your searches by type of work, location, hours, and even specific jobs. For instance, if you want to work as a virtual nurse, you can visit ZipRecruiter and type “telemedicine” and your location into the search feature and you’ll get a listing of all available positions with real companies in your area.
Where you actually set up shop is entirely up to you. Maybe you have a dedicated office space with a desktop and a view. Sounds nice. If you don’t, that’s also fine; I usually work on my laptop at a kitchen counter. The point here is to clearly define the part of your house where work happens. That makes it more likely that you’ll actually get things done when you’re there, but just as importantly might help you disconnect when you’re not. Remember that when you work from home you’re always at home—but you’re also always at work. At all costs, you should avoid turning your entire house or apartment into an amorphous space where you’re always on the clock but also kind of not. It’s no way to live. (Full-time remote workers take note: You can also write off a few hundred square feet of in-home office space on your tax return.)
On the one hand, working remotely for several years has probably made me a little paranoid. On the other hand, your colleagues are all talking about you behind your back. Kidding! (Mostly.) In truth, the bigger concern with working remotely is that they'll forget you're there at all. You inevitably miss the impromptu meetings and side conversations that spin little ideas into big projects. Which is mostly OK—you'll get caught up, especially in an environment when most people are working from home.
“The most notable change we’ve seen over the past year is not so much the growth in the sheer volume of remote job listings, but the growth in the variety of remote job titles these companies are seeking to hire,” said Sara Sutton, founder and CEO of FlexJobs. “Companies are expanding the range of professional positions they’re allowing to work from home.” 
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