“I think the most important factor in successfully working from home is setting a boundary between work and personal time,” warns Russ Thornton, who runs Wealthcare for Women from his home. “Many jobs can suck up all your available time if you let them. When I “shut down” for the day, I shut off my computer, leave my office, and only very rarely do I set foot back in my office before I start work the next morning.”
That said, the at-home job niche has been challenging to navigate for many job seekers because of the prevalence of job search scams. At FlexJobs, we know finding legitimate work-from-home jobs isn’t easy. That’s why we exist! Our team researches and vets every job posting that’s on our site to ensure legitimacy. Check out these companies that hire for legitimate work-from-home jobs.
Kelly Services is one of the most popular employment agencies in the US. Best known for temporary jobs, the company began operations in 1946, and now offers positions in more than 30 countries around the world. It has more than 500,000 workers around the globe. Ranked Number 8 on the FlexJobs 2019 list, Kelly Services has moved up two notches for 2020.

So! If your employer has asked you to stay home, here are some strategies for keeping it together, gleaned from someone who’s been doing it since “slack” was mostly a verb. Note: This is not a guide to responsible prepping, washing your hands, or scavenging Purell, although by all means do those things. It's mostly a reminder to draw bright lines between work and the rest of your life. It also draws on my own experience, so it hopefully goes without saying that your mileage may vary.
On the one hand, working remotely for several years has probably made me a little paranoid. On the other hand, your colleagues are all talking about you behind your back. Kidding! (Mostly.) In truth, the bigger concern with working remotely is that they'll forget you're there at all. You inevitably miss the impromptu meetings and side conversations that spin little ideas into big projects. Which is mostly OK—you'll get caught up, especially in an environment when most people are working from home.
If you’re interested in working for a specific company, visit their website and search for their “careers” or “job openings” page. That should provide you with the application process, salary information, and what positions are currently open. If it’s a smaller company, you might want to reach out to the owner if nothing is listed on their website. They might not have updated their website to reflect current openings.
Yes, working from home has its perks. You’re always there to accept deliveries. You can play whatever music you want as loudly as you want. You don’t have to abide the loud chewing or ungracious smells of your colleagues. But you also have to contend with the Scylla and Charybdis of isolation and distraction. Loss of productivity feels less urgent in the time of coronavirus. Spend enough time working alone, though, and you may start to lose your sense of self.
So! If your employer has asked you to stay home, here are some strategies for keeping it together, gleaned from someone who’s been doing it since “slack” was mostly a verb. Note: This is not a guide to responsible prepping, washing your hands, or scavenging Purell, although by all means do those things. It's mostly a reminder to draw bright lines between work and the rest of your life. It also draws on my own experience, so it hopefully goes without saying that your mileage may vary.
Look, you’re going to snack. Constantly. It’s something to do! Why type when you can chomp? That walk to the pantry or snack drawer is the perfect procrastination. The best I can do is to encourage you to keep something remotely healthy on hand—baby carrot crunch is a satisfying stress reliever—so that when you do finish off a bag of something in one sitting, it’s not, like, Guy Fieri's Double Salt Fajita Pringles or whatever.
Dr. Bill Schindler, a professor of archeology and anthropology at Washington College, demonstrates a couple of the most effective methods for starting a fire in the wilderness. "Even though you may never find yourself in a survival situation, I firmly believe that learning and practicing these primitive skills are an essential part of connecting to your past, your environment, and everything it means to be human," says Bill, explaining why it's important to have basic survival skills knowledge.
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