I don’t have a great solution for this. Quitting out of Slack—or whatever your workplace uses—is probably a good start. People are less likely to ping you if your circle’s not green. Or maybe find a gym class or extracurricular that you have to leave the house for at a certain time every day and let that be your stopping point? In some ways it’s like figuring out how to ditch your shadow.
I think what I miss the most about working in an office is the commute (I realize this may sound unhinged). Yes, traffic is terrible and subways are crowded and the weather is unpredictable. But it seems nice to have a clear separation between when you’re at work and when you’re not, and some time to decompress in between. That doesn’t exist when you work from home. It’s all on the same continuum.
You can get started with freelance writing by taking a course like Holly Johnson’s Earn More Writing that teaches you how to set your rates and land clients. Make sure you have a portfolio of writing samples to show to prospective clients. If you’re new to freelancing and have a blog, you can use the original blog content you’ve written until you have client work to showcase. 

Every few days I spend at least a few hours at a coffee shop. It’s a change of scenery, a good excuse to get some fresh air, and provides a tiny bit of human interaction that Slack conversations and Zoom meetings do not. Should that no longer be feasible for coronavirus reasons, at the very least see if you can walk around the block a couple of times a day. There’s no water cooler when you work from home, no snack table, no meetings down the block. It’s easy to stay locked in position all day. Don’t do it! Sitting is terrible for your health, and mind-numbing when you’re staring at the same wall or window all day.

Still, there are so many unique opportunities to land remote transcription work. If you’re a beginner, your best option is to sign up with transcription job sites like Rev and Scribie to find paying jobs that you can do on a contractor basis. You can also offer your services on Fiverr or reach out to companies and entrepreneurs to pitch them your services. For example, if you like a specific podcast, see if they need someone to transcribe episodes.
If you’re looking for a more traditional job, start by looking on sites like ZipRecruiter, Indeed.com, Glassdoor, or even LinkedIn’s job board. You can filter your searches by type of work, location, hours, and even specific jobs. For instance, if you want to work as a virtual nurse, you can visit ZipRecruiter and type “telemedicine” and your location into the search feature and you’ll get a listing of all available positions with real companies in your area.
The job: Listen up, take notes and get paid. Transcribe Anywhere offers online transcription courses that teach students how to transcribe and also how to start their own freelance transcribing businesses. The online course will lead you through modules, practice dictations and quizzes. It even shows you how to create a website and how to secure clients.
If you’re good with a sewing machine or needle and thread, working from home as a seamstress is a viable job option. You can contract to work with dress shops altering wedding, bridesmaids, or prom dresses and other formal wear. If you prefer, you can work as a freelancers doing custom projects like curtains, slip covers, or offer alterations on jeans and other clothes.
Where you actually set up shop is entirely up to you. Maybe you have a dedicated office space with a desktop and a view. Sounds nice. If you don’t, that’s also fine; I usually work on my laptop at a kitchen counter. The point here is to clearly define the part of your house where work happens. That makes it more likely that you’ll actually get things done when you’re there, but just as importantly might help you disconnect when you’re not. Remember that when you work from home you’re always at home—but you’re also always at work. At all costs, you should avoid turning your entire house or apartment into an amorphous space where you’re always on the clock but also kind of not. It’s no way to live. (Full-time remote workers take note: You can also write off a few hundred square feet of in-home office space on your tax return.)

Creating content and engaging with fans and customers is a time-consuming task that many businesses don’t have the bandwidth to do in-house. As a result, they prefer to outsource the task. While some companies do have full-time in-house social media managers, it’s often cheaper to hire a part-time remote worker for this role. This opens up positions for work-from-home freelancers.
Yes, working from home has its perks. You’re always there to accept deliveries. You can play whatever music you want as loudly as you want. You don’t have to abide the loud chewing or ungracious smells of your colleagues. But you also have to contend with the Scylla and Charybdis of isolation and distraction. Loss of productivity feels less urgent in the time of coronavirus. Spend enough time working alone, though, and you may start to lose your sense of self.
The website estimates that the average person could save around $4,000 a year by working from home. Dry cleaning and laundering ($500 - $1,500) ranked as one of the largest costs of working from an office, as well as lunches and coffee ($1,040). Commuting also factored in, with items like gas ($686) or car maintenance ($767) costing additional money over the year. 
You’ll also need to be sure your workspace is comfortable. “A good strategy is to implement is a standing desk,” recommends Anthony Montenegro, Founder of The Blackmont Group. “Brands such as Varidesk even come as handy low-cost laptop versions. Taking intermittent standing breaks while continuing to labor productively at your desk can break the monotony of sitting all day.”
If you want to get a work from home job make your resume sticks out and start with some of these tips. One easy and quick improvement you can make is to add a testimonial or two to your resume along with more specific skills and achievements. If you want the flexibility of being able to work from home, you may also want to brush up on your interview skills. Even though employers and hiring managers likely won't be able to meet you in person, they'll still want to interview you either over the phone or via video call. Check out these 5 successful tips for a great interview!
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Every few days I spend at least a few hours at a coffee shop. It’s a change of scenery, a good excuse to get some fresh air, and provides a tiny bit of human interaction that Slack conversations and Zoom meetings do not. Should that no longer be feasible for coronavirus reasons, at the very least see if you can walk around the block a couple of times a day. There’s no water cooler when you work from home, no snack table, no meetings down the block. It’s easy to stay locked in position all day. Don’t do it! Sitting is terrible for your health, and mind-numbing when you’re staring at the same wall or window all day.
“The most notable change we’ve seen over the past year is not so much the growth in the sheer volume of remote job listings, but the growth in the variety of remote job titles these companies are seeking to hire,” said Sara Sutton, founder and CEO of FlexJobs. “Companies are expanding the range of professional positions they’re allowing to work from home.”  
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