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“I think the most important factor in successfully working from home is setting a boundary between work and personal time,” warns Russ Thornton, who runs Wealthcare for Women from his home. “Many jobs can suck up all your available time if you let them. When I “shut down” for the day, I shut off my computer, leave my office, and only very rarely do I set foot back in my office before I start work the next morning.” 

Sorry. Unless you work in an office that already has CNN or CNBC or whatever on all day in the corner, no television. You are not as good at working with that background noise as you think. And that one little break to catch up on Better Call Saul will invariably turn into a binge. This applies to videogames, books—anything but music, really. Basically, if you wouldn’t do it at the office, don’t do it at home when you’re working. Boundaries!
If you’re looking for a work-at-home position, even among some of the employers listed above, you should be aware that not all such positions will be readily available. You may have to go on the company’s careers page or job board and enter terms such as “work-at-home”, “work-from-home”, “remote position”, or something similar. This will be especially important if most of the jobs offered by an employer are on-site.
“The most notable change we’ve seen over the past year is not so much the growth in the sheer volume of remote job listings, but the growth in the variety of remote job titles these companies are seeking to hire,” said Sara Sutton, founder and CEO of FlexJobs. “Companies are expanding the range of professional positions they’re allowing to work from home.” 
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