Every few days I spend at least a few hours at a coffee shop. It’s a change of scenery, a good excuse to get some fresh air, and provides a tiny bit of human interaction that Slack conversations and Zoom meetings do not. Should that no longer be feasible for coronavirus reasons, at the very least see if you can walk around the block a couple of times a day. There’s no water cooler when you work from home, no snack table, no meetings down the block. It’s easy to stay locked in position all day. Don’t do it! Sitting is terrible for your health, and mind-numbing when you’re staring at the same wall or window all day.

Lionbridge is currently hiring corporate associates in technology, finance, marketing and sales, as well as translators and interpreters. One interesting subcategory is testers, raters and curators. These home-based positions are open to college students, as well as home-based workers. Industries serviced including banking and finance, gaming, manufacturing, legal services, and life sciences.
Like Liveops, Working Solutions functions as a flexible call center. They work with some of the biggest companies in their respective industries, including Hotels.com, Sylvan Learning, Microsoft, T-Mobile, Michael’s, and StubHub. The company is based in Dallas, Texas, and began operations in 1996. They employ home-based workers in sales, service, and technical support throughout the US and Canada.
You’ll also need to be sure your workspace is comfortable. “A good strategy is to implement is a standing desk,” recommends Anthony Montenegro, Founder of The Blackmont Group. “Brands such as Varidesk even come as handy low-cost laptop versions. Taking intermittent standing breaks while continuing to labor productively at your desk can break the monotony of sitting all day.”
Like Liveops, Working Solutions functions as a flexible call center. They work with some of the biggest companies in their respective industries, including Hotels.com, Sylvan Learning, Microsoft, T-Mobile, Michael’s, and StubHub. The company is based in Dallas, Texas, and began operations in 1996. They employ home-based workers in sales, service, and technical support throughout the US and Canada.
Hi Lashay, I just discovered your website, it’s wonderfully informative and hopefully exactly what I need to help make some extra money in my down time. I was wondering if you have any tips or if you could direct me to some of your videos that might already address my situation. I already have a full time job, but for the most part I’m still in need of additional earnings. What advice do you have for someone like me who would mostly be available during evenings to make some decent money working from home? I appreciate anything you think will help, thank you!
As the new coronavirus continues its romp around the globe, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended “social distancing” as one way to combat the spread of disease. So far in the United States, that’s meant the canceling of conferences like Facebook's F8 and anticipatory Costco raids by Covid-19 preppers. Companies like Twitter and Square—which share Jack Dorsey as CEO—have now taken the next logical step of asking employees to work from home whenever possible, and more could potentially follow their lead. As someone who has worked remotely for nearly a decade, I am here to tell you: It's not easy. But setting some boundaries will go a long way toward keeping you sane.
Not to get too personal right off the bat, but put some clothes on. It’s tempting, I know, to roll out of bed and blob over to your laptop in your pajamas. Or maybe not even get out of bed in the first place? It’s a trap. If you’re dressed for sleep, it’s going to be a lot harder to get your brain up to a canter, much less a gallop. (In this metaphor your brain is a horse, go with it.) More important, though, if you don’t get up, take a shower, brush your teeth, get dressed—whatever your morning routine entails when you actually do go into the office—you’re breaking the cardinal rule of working from home: Set boundaries.
Where you actually set up shop is entirely up to you. Maybe you have a dedicated office space with a desktop and a view. Sounds nice. If you don’t, that’s also fine; I usually work on my laptop at a kitchen counter. The point here is to clearly define the part of your house where work happens. That makes it more likely that you’ll actually get things done when you’re there, but just as importantly might help you disconnect when you’re not. Remember that when you work from home you’re always at home—but you’re also always at work. At all costs, you should avoid turning your entire house or apartment into an amorphous space where you’re always on the clock but also kind of not. It’s no way to live. (Full-time remote workers take note: You can also write off a few hundred square feet of in-home office space on your tax return.) 

“I think the most important factor in successfully working from home is setting a boundary between work and personal time,” warns Russ Thornton, who runs Wealthcare for Women from his home. “Many jobs can suck up all your available time if you let them. When I “shut down” for the day, I shut off my computer, leave my office, and only very rarely do I set foot back in my office before I start work the next morning.” 
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