#24 – Magoosh – If you are good at GMAT, GRE, TOEFL, SAT, and ACT, and tests, Magoosh is looking to hire online test prep experts to help students prepare for these papers. As a requirement, you must be an experienced BA or BS holder with high scores in GRE, SAT, GMAT. The standard pay for weekdays is $20 an hour and shoots up to $25 an hour over the weekends.
As long as you have a great resume and do well during your interview, you'll be well on your way to starting a work from home job. When conducting your job search, it's also important to look out for scams. They are several out there so you have to be careful. My main rule of thumb is – if it sounds a little good to be true, then chances are it's a scam. Our job board is a great place to go when searching for legit new work from home leads to help you avoid falling victim to a scam.

#48 – Stitch Fix – Read review – If you are a fashionista with a creative eye, try Stitch Fix a company that allows you to share fashion tips with clients on the site. For work at home stylist, Stitch Fix offers a $16+ an hour pay. As a requirement, you must be 18 years of age or more and be ready to attend their off-site training before starting the job.


That said, the at-home job niche has been challenging to navigate for many job seekers because of the prevalence of job search scams. At FlexJobs, we know finding legitimate work-from-home jobs isn’t easy. That’s why we exist! Our team researches and vets every job posting that’s on our site to ensure legitimacy. Check out these companies that hire for legitimate work-from-home jobs.
I think what I miss the most about working in an office is the commute (I realize this may sound unhinged). Yes, traffic is terrible and subways are crowded and the weather is unpredictable. But it seems nice to have a clear separation between when you’re at work and when you’re not, and some time to decompress in between. That doesn’t exist when you work from home. It’s all on the same continuum.
Where you actually set up shop is entirely up to you. Maybe you have a dedicated office space with a desktop and a view. Sounds nice. If you don’t, that’s also fine; I usually work on my laptop at a kitchen counter. The point here is to clearly define the part of your house where work happens. That makes it more likely that you’ll actually get things done when you’re there, but just as importantly might help you disconnect when you’re not. Remember that when you work from home you’re always at home—but you’re also always at work. At all costs, you should avoid turning your entire house or apartment into an amorphous space where you’re always on the clock but also kind of not. It’s no way to live. (Full-time remote workers take note: You can also write off a few hundred square feet of in-home office space on your tax return.)

As is typically the case with remote positions, you will need to have a dedicated workspace in your home, and a PC with a high-speed Internet connection. You may also need to purchase specific equipment, which could include a headset, flash drive, or a dual monitor. You must also be a “people person”, and will be required to be available seven days a week.
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Dr. Bill Schindler, a professor of archeology and anthropology at Washington College, demonstrates a couple of the most effective methods for starting a fire in the wilderness. "Even though you may never find yourself in a survival situation, I firmly believe that learning and practicing these primitive skills are an essential part of connecting to your past, your environment, and everything it means to be human," says Bill, explaining why it's important to have basic survival skills knowledge.
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