Not to get too personal right off the bat, but put some clothes on. It’s tempting, I know, to roll out of bed and blob over to your laptop in your pajamas. Or maybe not even get out of bed in the first place? It’s a trap. If you’re dressed for sleep, it’s going to be a lot harder to get your brain up to a canter, much less a gallop. (In this metaphor your brain is a horse, go with it.) More important, though, if you don’t get up, take a shower, brush your teeth, get dressed—whatever your morning routine entails when you actually do go into the office—you’re breaking the cardinal rule of working from home: Set boundaries.
If you were not able to find luck with the list of jobs I have presented above, visit FlexJobs. This job site has been rated by the Better Business Bureau with an A+. They even provide a money-back guarantee in case you are not satisfied with how they deliver their service. FlexJobs assures that every single work posted is hand-screened to check its legitimacy. This is a fantastic method to find legit home-based jobs without the worries of handling scams.
Where you actually set up shop is entirely up to you. Maybe you have a dedicated office space with a desktop and a view. Sounds nice. If you don’t, that’s also fine; I usually work on my laptop at a kitchen counter. The point here is to clearly define the part of your house where work happens. That makes it more likely that you’ll actually get things done when you’re there, but just as importantly might help you disconnect when you’re not. Remember that when you work from home you’re always at home—but you’re also always at work. At all costs, you should avoid turning your entire house or apartment into an amorphous space where you’re always on the clock but also kind of not. It’s no way to live. (Full-time remote workers take note: You can also write off a few hundred square feet of in-home office space on your tax return.)
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So! If your employer has asked you to stay home, here are some strategies for keeping it together, gleaned from someone who’s been doing it since “slack” was mostly a verb. Note: This is not a guide to responsible prepping, washing your hands, or scavenging Purell, although by all means do those things. It's mostly a reminder to draw bright lines between work and the rest of your life. It also draws on my own experience, so it hopefully goes without saying that your mileage may vary.
The company offers placements with many of the biggest employers in the US and globally. Many of the positions are in accounting and finance, administrative positions, the automotive field, engineering, information technology and call centers. But as such a large and well-established employment firm, you can expect to find just about any type of position that fits your skill set.
If you’re looking for a more traditional job, start by looking on sites like ZipRecruiter, Indeed.com, Glassdoor, or even LinkedIn’s job board. You can filter your searches by type of work, location, hours, and even specific jobs. For instance, if you want to work as a virtual nurse, you can visit ZipRecruiter and type “telemedicine” and your location into the search feature and you’ll get a listing of all available positions with real companies in your area.
Creating content and engaging with fans and customers is a time-consuming task that many businesses don’t have the bandwidth to do in-house. As a result, they prefer to outsource the task. While some companies do have full-time in-house social media managers, it’s often cheaper to hire a part-time remote worker for this role. This opens up positions for work-from-home freelancers.
“I think the most important factor in successfully working from home is setting a boundary between work and personal time,” warns Russ Thornton, who runs Wealthcare for Women from his home. “Many jobs can suck up all your available time if you let them. When I “shut down” for the day, I shut off my computer, leave my office, and only very rarely do I set foot back in my office before I start work the next morning.”

Kelly Services is one of the most popular employment agencies in the US. Best known for temporary jobs, the company began operations in 1946, and now offers positions in more than 30 countries around the world. It has more than 500,000 workers around the globe. Ranked Number 8 on the FlexJobs 2019 list, Kelly Services has moved up two notches for 2020.
I don’t have a great solution for this. Quitting out of Slack—or whatever your workplace uses—is probably a good start. People are less likely to ping you if your circle’s not green. Or maybe find a gym class or extracurricular that you have to leave the house for at a certain time every day and let that be your stopping point? In some ways it’s like figuring out how to ditch your shadow.

Many of the positions are academically oriented, particularly in teaching, though they offer many other opportunities. These include general management and administration, sales and marketing, technology, operations and customer service, finance and business intelligence. They even offer creative positions, designing the learning experience. Subcategories include branding, graphic and interactive design, campaigns, user experience, and video and animation.
Sorry. Unless you work in an office that already has CNN or CNBC or whatever on all day in the corner, no television. You are not as good at working with that background noise as you think. And that one little break to catch up on Better Call Saul will invariably turn into a binge. This applies to videogames, books—anything but music, really. Basically, if you wouldn’t do it at the office, don’t do it at home when you’re working. Boundaries!
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