As is typically the case with remote positions, you will need to have a dedicated workspace in your home, and a PC with a high-speed Internet connection. You may also need to purchase specific equipment, which could include a headset, flash drive, or a dual monitor. You must also be a “people person”, and will be required to be available seven days a week.

I think the best solution, both for your work life and sanity, is to use Slack more than functionally. Check in with people even if you don't have a work-related reason to. Send them dumb tweets. Don't be afraid of italics and exclamation points. It'll never be the same as grabbing a midday coffee or a beer after work, but it helps to remind people that you're not just out there in the void. And when the conversation does center around work, know when to switch from Slack to phone. You'll be surprised how much can get lost in translation when you only type.

That said, the at-home job niche has been challenging to navigate for many job seekers because of the prevalence of job search scams. At FlexJobs, we know finding legitimate work-from-home jobs isn’t easy. That’s why we exist! Our team researches and vets every job posting that’s on our site to ensure legitimacy. Check out these companies that hire for legitimate work-from-home jobs.
Companies these days are expanding their office boundaries to incorporate the idea of working from home. These work from home companies offer employees flexible working hours, better pay and freedom from office walls. Even though the internet is flooded with many online jobs, there are some that offer better pay. Here is a list of work from home firms that are willing to pay $16 per hour or more for home-based jobs.
I don’t have a great solution for this. Quitting out of Slack—or whatever your workplace uses—is probably a good start. People are less likely to ping you if your circle’s not green. Or maybe find a gym class or extracurricular that you have to leave the house for at a certain time every day and let that be your stopping point? In some ways it’s like figuring out how to ditch your shadow.
Many of the positions are academically oriented, particularly in teaching, though they offer many other opportunities. These include general management and administration, sales and marketing, technology, operations and customer service, finance and business intelligence. They even offer creative positions, designing the learning experience. Subcategories include branding, graphic and interactive design, campaigns, user experience, and video and animation.
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This list is great, thanks! I wanted to point out, though, that it looks like at least some of the transcription jobs are listed as paying per audio hour which would work out to a lot less per hour of work. One hour of audio can take 3 to 4 hours for an experienced transcriber to complete, so $24/audio hour=$6-8/hour. Just something for people to be aware of.
This list is great, thanks! I wanted to point out, though, that it looks like at least some of the transcription jobs are listed as paying per audio hour which would work out to a lot less per hour of work. One hour of audio can take 3 to 4 hours for an experienced transcriber to complete, so $24/audio hour=$6-8/hour. Just something for people to be aware of.

I think what I miss the most about working in an office is the commute (I realize this may sound unhinged). Yes, traffic is terrible and subways are crowded and the weather is unpredictable. But it seems nice to have a clear separation between when you’re at work and when you’re not, and some time to decompress in between. That doesn’t exist when you work from home. It’s all on the same continuum.
Not to get too personal right off the bat, but put some clothes on. It’s tempting, I know, to roll out of bed and blob over to your laptop in your pajamas. Or maybe not even get out of bed in the first place? It’s a trap. If you’re dressed for sleep, it’s going to be a lot harder to get your brain up to a canter, much less a gallop. (In this metaphor your brain is a horse, go with it.) More important, though, if you don’t get up, take a shower, brush your teeth, get dressed—whatever your morning routine entails when you actually do go into the office—you’re breaking the cardinal rule of working from home: Set boundaries.
You’ll also need to be sure your workspace is comfortable. “A good strategy is to implement is a standing desk,” recommends Anthony Montenegro, Founder of The Blackmont Group. “Brands such as Varidesk even come as handy low-cost laptop versions. Taking intermittent standing breaks while continuing to labor productively at your desk can break the monotony of sitting all day.”
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