“I think the most important factor in successfully working from home is setting a boundary between work and personal time,” warns Russ Thornton, who runs Wealthcare for Women from his home. “Many jobs can suck up all your available time if you let them. When I “shut down” for the day, I shut off my computer, leave my office, and only very rarely do I set foot back in my office before I start work the next morning.”
If you’re good with a sewing machine or needle and thread, working from home as a seamstress is a viable job option. You can contract to work with dress shops altering wedding, bridesmaids, or prom dresses and other formal wear. If you prefer, you can work as a freelancers doing custom projects like curtains, slip covers, or offer alterations on jeans and other clothes.

Yes, working from home has its perks. You’re always there to accept deliveries. You can play whatever music you want as loudly as you want. You don’t have to abide the loud chewing or ungracious smells of your colleagues. But you also have to contend with the Scylla and Charybdis of isolation and distraction. Loss of productivity feels less urgent in the time of coronavirus. Spend enough time working alone, though, and you may start to lose your sense of self.
After finding success as a proofreader, Caitlin Pyle started to teach others how to do the same. She launched her course, Proofread Anywhere, that covers the tools and skills you need to be an effective proofreader including, how to get started and where to find clients. To see if proofreading is a good fit for you, check out her free online workshop.
Still, there are so many unique opportunities to land remote transcription work. If you’re a beginner, your best option is to sign up with transcription job sites like Rev and Scribie to find paying jobs that you can do on a contractor basis. You can also offer your services on Fiverr or reach out to companies and entrepreneurs to pitch them your services. For example, if you like a specific podcast, see if they need someone to transcribe episodes.
I think what I miss the most about working in an office is the commute (I realize this may sound unhinged). Yes, traffic is terrible and subways are crowded and the weather is unpredictable. But it seems nice to have a clear separation between when you’re at work and when you’re not, and some time to decompress in between. That doesn’t exist when you work from home. It’s all on the same continuum.
#4-Transcriptionist – Transcriptionists type out audio files and can get paid pretty well for doing it. The files could be audio or video. They'll listen to an audio file and translate it into a long-form text document. An experienced transcriptionist can earn anywhere from $15-$30 per hour.  Some jobs do have a quick turn around time so the faster you type, the better off you will be at this work.
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